A liquor license sought for Unley Park Bakery

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A Baker that has operated a Bakery on Unley Road since 2010 providing an extensive range of breads, pastries and other baked products wanted to diversify. The premises was classified as Bakery and Café but wanted to extend its trading hours and be able to serve a selection of alcoholic beverages. This was classified as a change of use to Bakery/Café/Restaurant by Council in 2017 because although the subject bakery is located on busy Unley Road this area is zoned residential (Residential RB 300 Zone).

When the original proposal was approved by Council in 2009 there was some objections to establishing a Bakery and Cafe from some nearby residents. Because the change of use included a Restaurant in a residential zone the use was classified as non-complying again requiring extensive notification of nearby residents and the public generally. It is worth noting that even though the proposal included a license for the premises the only comments received by Council in response to the notification were six representations supporting the proposed change of use.
The proposal subsequently approved by Council in December 2017 is for the same amount of seating and parking as already exists. The difference is that the application sought trading hours be extended until 10pm in the evening and if seated in the bakery/ restaurant it is possible to have an alcoholic drink because the premises would have a liquor license.
It was accepted by Council that the extended hours and license would not have any detrimental impact on the locality or nearby residents. Unley Road is a busy arterial road carrying substantial volumes of traffic in the day and well into the evening. The licensed areas in question front Unley Road so residents predominantly to the rear of the Bakery were never going to be impacted.
From a pure planning point of view a change of use from a commercial land use to commercial use is not considered significant because the existing land use is already non- residential. The minor redevelopment or change of use is minor in nature and will preserve or enhance the character and amenity of the area. It is unlikely the non-residential use would be returned to a residential use.

S.G.
January 2018